Overview

General Purpose Dry Type 600 Volts and Below Overview

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), update in the Energy Policy Act of 2005, authorized the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate and set minimum efficiency levels for Low Voltage Distribution Ttransformers. The DOE published a final rule prescribing new energy conservation standards for distribution transformers. 78 FR 23335 (April 18, 2013).

10 CFR 431.196: The efficiency of a low-voltage dry-type distribution transformer manufactured on or after January 1, 2016, shall be no less than that required for their kVA rating in the table below. Low-voltage dry-type distribution transformers with kVA ratings not appearing in the table shall have their minimum efficiency level determined by linear interpolation of the kVA and efficiency values immediately above and below that kVA rating. All efficiency values are at thirty-five percent of nameplate-rated load temperature corrected to 75°C, determined according to the DOE Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Distribution Transformers under Appendix A to Subpart K of 10 CFR part 431.

Energy Conservation Standards for Low-Voltage Dry-Type Distribution Transformers

Single phase

Three phase

kVA

Efficiency % [1]

kVA

Efficiency % [1]

15

97.70

15

97.89

25

98.00

30

98.23

37.5

98.20

45

98.40

50

98.30

75

98.60

75

98.50

112.5

98.74

100

98.60

150

98.83

167

98.70

225

98.94

250

98.80

300

99.02

333

98.90

500

99.14

750

99.23

1000

99.28


Distribution transformer means a transformer that (1) has an input voltage of 34.5 kV or less; (2) has an ouput voltage of 600 V or less; (3) is rated for operation at a frequency of 60 Hz; and (4) has a capacity of 10 to 2500 kVA for liquid-immersed units and 15 to 2500 kVA for dry-type units.

Low voltage dry-type distribution transformer means a distribution transformer that: has an input voltage of 600 V or less, is air-cooled, and not used oil as a coolant.

The following product offering must comply with the table above:

  • Three- and single-phase

  • Step up and step down transformers

  • General purpose ventilated transformers (isolation transformers)

  • Watchdog general purpose ventilated transformers (low temperature rise)

  • Transformers designed for harmonic applications (K-rated, harmonic mitigating, data center transformers, etc.)

  • General purpose open core and coil transformers

The following low voltage transformers do not need to comply with the table above:

  • Auto-transformers

  • Drive isolation transformers

  • Non-ventilated transformers

  • Resin encapsulated transformers

  • Buck boost transformers

  • Control transformers (machine tool)

  • Medical isolation panel transformers compliance with UL 1047 (tables 30.1 and 30.2) (SPECIAL IZ — LOW LEAKAGE)

New Three-Phase Offering from Square D — DOE 2016 EX

  • Exceed the efficiency levels from 10 CFR 431.196

  • Terminals sized to handle wire ranges to match Square D circuit breakers, switches, panelboards, etc.

    Located to meet NEC bending radius and layout to simplifiy connections

  • IZ Levels to allow for designing with the minimum AIC Panels available
  • In-rush current limited to expand the Square D circuit breaker options at both 125 and 250% sizing
  • Sound level at 3 dB for all designs, but up to 6–10 dB below on certain units—QUIET QUALITY
  • 1/2 in. clearance from the rear and side, UL 1561 ALCOVE TESTING ALL ENCLOSURES TO NOT EXCEED 90°C ON ADJACENT WALLS
  • Four product families of the DOE 2016 EX: General purpose, aluminum and copper windings, 150°C rise; Watchdog, low temperature rise, aluminum and coover windings, 115 or 80°C rise; Two solutions for harominic loads: K-13 Wye secondary, harmonic mitigating transformers and K-9 ZigZag secondary, harmonic mitigating transformers.

Footnotes

  1. Efficiencies are determined at the following reference conditions:
    (1) for no-load losses, at the temperature of 20°C; (2) for load-losses, at the temperature of 75°C and 35% of nameplate load. (Source: Table 4–2 of National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Standard TP–1–2002, Guide for Determining Energy Efficiency for Distribution Transformers.)

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